Archive for November, 2002

   Your Salon Blog Tour

November 29, 2002

 

 Your Salon Blog Tour of Quality  

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MT client for Mac Classic?

November 29, 2002

A friend has started blogging with MT and she is still running OS 9 on her iBook. We were discussing the problems with the web interface, particularly the form-based text box, where there is a high risk of accidentally munging your own work. I showed her how to select all, copy, and paste into a sticky note and save that as a backup, but paradoxically, this takes away from the immediacy and convenience of working in the browser.
The solution is to save the post as a draft in the MT interface, I realized, but I also got to thinking about another alternative: using a desktop client. On my Powerbook I use kung-log, but is there an analogous application that runs on a Mac Classic?

   Your Salon Blog Tour

November 28, 2002

 

 Your Salon Blog Tour of Quality  

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Grateful. For an often-morose moper,

November 28, 2002

Grateful. For an often-morose moper, I have lots to be grateful for. I’m healthy, young(-ish), privileged, and free. I work at home. I live in a beautiful mediterranean climate. I have maintained a love affair for over a decade. I am still learning to know myself better, to listen to my…

Grateful

November 28, 2002

For an often-morose moper, I have lots to be grateful for. I’m healthy, young(-ish), privileged, and free. I work at home. I live in a beautiful mediterranean climate. I have maintained a love affair for over a decade. I am still learning to know myself better, to listen to my body, to express my emotions. I am thankful for music. I appreciate the gifts I’ve been given. I am grateful for my voice. I thank you all for your attention.

Blog gender gap?

November 28, 2002

Lisa Guernsey has recently started a weblog about search engines. She writes in today’s Circuits section of the New York Times about the relative prominence of men in the blogosphere as compared with women.
Many have pointed out, however, that blogs are a fairly egalitarian format, with women, people of color, and other groups who have not always had access to the power of the press in on the game from the very beginning.
Guernsey has a few theories. One is the old saw about men and women and public and private spheres (“women write diaries, men pontificate about politics”):

And that is where things get touchy. People who track blogs hate to make generalizations, but many acknowledged that female bloggers often have more of an inward focus, keeping personal diaries about their daily lives.

If that is the case, the Venus-Mars divide has made its way into Blogville. Women want to talk about their personal lives. Men want to talk about anything but. So far the people who have received the most publicity (often courtesy of male journalists) appear to be the latter.

But I don’t buy this. I started an online “diary”-type journal years ago and I’ve kept it up on and off ever since. Some of the most popular blogs that happen to be by men are highly personal and even intimate.
The other theories, that men bring a dominance from old media and journalism and the technology business into the blogosphere, rings a little more true to me. There is a kind of momentum here. The sample also gets skewed when you look at pundit and journalist bloggers and the people they read and comment on. They get more press in the trad media and the stereotype gets reinforced.
(Guernsey points out, for example, that Instapundit’s blogroll is heavily tilted towards men, as is Scott Rosenberg’s. I haven’t done a gender analysis of my own blogroll. Maybe I should.)
Are men statistically more likely than women to promote their own ideas about public things and try to build a large audience of strangers? Are women more likely than men to write about the things in their personal lives, their hobbies, their obsessions? I wonder.
Nice plug for the Julie/Julia Project in the article. No mention of Salon Blogs’ superstar blogger who happens to be female.

What Would Jesus blog?

November 27, 2002

Your Salon Blog Tour of Quality

So I’m on the road, trying to find something decent on the radio, and I stumble across this guy, Judge Andrew Napolitano. He is sitting in on a talk show, and has become very worked up by recent sociological events. Well, what ho, that

Do the pink robots win?

November 27, 2002

Last night I saw the Flaming Lips open for Beck and then back him for the second half of his set. Good show, interesting alchemy. I have all of Beck’s records except his most recent one. And I only have the most recent Lips record, but I’ve listened to it a lot and plan to work my way backward in their increasingly noisy ouevre (kind of like surfing back through the Meat Puppets’ output).
Outside the Paramount I asked Bill and Jeff if they read the album the same way I do. To me, it sounds like Yoshimi loses to the pink robots. (She sure does a lot of screaming in part two of her battle.) Bill thought I was taking it all too literally, and that it’s not a concept album outside of that song or maybe a few others in the first half. Jeff wasn’t sure. He thought Yoshimi won.
It may well be that I’m taking the whole rock opera conceit too seriously here. The story, if it exists, does get vaguer as the record wears on, and like most rock ‘n’ roll, just about every track can be read as a love song. There are songs where the lyrics can mean one thing if said between two lovers and another if part of a sci-fi storyline (“you and me/were never meant to be/part of the future,” for example).
What follows is what textual basis I can find for my reading of the story, from the teensy lyrics in the liner materials of the CD.

(more…)

Do the pink robots win?

November 27, 2002

Last night I saw the Flaming Lips open for Beck and then back him for the second half of his set. Good show, interesting alchemy. I have all of Beck’s records except his most recent one. And I only have the most recent Lips record, but I’ve listened to it a lot and plan to work my way backward in their increasingly noisy ouevre (kind of like surfing back through the Meat Puppets’ output).
Outside the Paramount I asked my friends Bill and Jeff if they read the album the same way I do. To me, it sounds like Yoshimi loses to the pink robots. (She sure does a lot of screaming in part two of her battle.) Bill thought I was taking it all too literally, and that it’s not a concept album outside of that song or maybe a few others in the first half. Jeff wasn’t sure. He thought Yoshimi won.
It may well be that I’m taking the whole rock opera conceit too seriously here….

metaxian blog ping aggregation

November 27, 2002

I’ll be pinging this entry to see if I can get my other blog posts listed here automatically on the category page (x-pings).